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Exciting News in 2013 Spring Update



June 2013



Activist\'s Toolkit now available



October 2012



SPCP ADVOCATES FOR BED BUG POLICY



November 2011



Dandelion: friend or foe?



May 2011



EPA Speaks on Propoxur



June 2010



Major New Study Details Connections Between Pesticides and ADHD



May 2010



EPA Requests Public Comment on Inerts



January 2010



Herbicide in Drinking Water



August 2009



Popular Herbicide Toxic to Human Liver Cells



August 2009



Pesticide Linked to Parkinson\'s disease



August 2009



Water Worries



April 2008



Intersex Frogs Found in Suburban Areas



April 2008



Exciting News in 2013 Spring Update



Safer Pest Control Project changes name to Midwest Pesticide Action Center




Midwest Pesticide Action Center

Our nearly 20 year old organization has changed its name to Midwest Pesticide Action Center (MPAC). As MPAC we are looking forward to continuing our work to reduce the health risks and environmental impacts of pesticides by promoting safer alternatives.

You can still receive news and updates from MPAC on Facebook and Twitter

Check out our newest Update for a special message from Ruth Kerzee, our Executive Director.





7_MPACPressRelease1.pdf





MPAC_Spring13_Update.pdf

Activist's Toolkit now available



Toolkit Available to Educate and Support Sustainable Landscape and Lawn Care Activists




Activists Toolkit

Safer Pest Control Project, with funding from Patagonia, has released a new resource that will inspire and educate current and future natural lawn care and sustainable landscape activists. The Activist’s Toolkit is aimed for those who want to change how their neighbors, schools, or cities care for their lawns and landscapes, and need advice about how to actually do it!

The Toolkit features information on the basics of natural lawn care, health benefits of switching from conventional to natural lawn care, as well as practical tools and example documents to use during a campaign.

Download your free copy of the Activist’s Toolkit and learn how to promote sustainable lawn and landscape care in your community. The toolkit can be found here.

SPCP ADVOCATES FOR BED BUG POLICY



This year SPCP has taken an active role in working on bed bug policy in Chicago and Illinois. Our Executive Director, Rachel Rosenberg, has served on the Illinois Bed Bug Task Force, which was tasked with delivering a report by the end of this year with recommendations on the prevention, management, and control of bed bug infestations. This report has been completed, will be provided to Illinois legislators, and is now available on our website.

SPCP also completed a bed bug policy paper, “Battling Bed Bugs in Chicago: Making the Case for a Comprehensive Plan.” This paper has been delivered to the Mayor’s Office and other key Alderman to demonstrate the necessity of taking action on this issue. We have met with the Mayor’s Office and multiple Aldermen and we will continue to engage the City and assist as they develop appropriate policies and programs to battle this formidable foe. 

 





SOBBREPORT_10_14_11Final.pdf





Bed_Bug_White_Paper_Final.pdf

Dandelion: friend or foe?



Watch Executive Director, Rachel Rosenberg, on WTTW's Chicago Tonight and Listen to Podcast on WGN Radio




Dandelions are popping up around Chicago, especially in Chicago's parks. Rachel explains how dandelions are a sign that pesticides are not being used on a lawn, meaning it is safer for children and pets. Watch the news story. Also listen to her interview on WGN Radio with Mike McConnell (interview starts at 15:45 in podcast).

Not a fan of dandelions in your yard? A lawn maintained with natural lawn care has fewer weed issues and is a healthier lawn overall. Natural lawn care is not the same as no lawn care. Learn more about natural lawn care through our fact sheets.

 

EPA Speaks on Propoxur



Ohio Governor has Bed Bug Concerns




Evironmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa P. Jackson responds to Ohio governor's appeal for reinstatement of residential use of Propoxur.  Jackson discusses the dangers of the pesticide and the benefits of Integrated Pest management (IPM).





EPAResponsetoOhioPropoxurRequest.pdf





PropoxurLettertoEPAfromOHGov4-19-10.pdf

Major New Study Details Connections Between Pesticides and ADHD



 

 

 

Children are more vulnerable to pesticides and a recent study published in the Journal of Pediatrics in June connects the dots for us more clearly than ever before. Check out this link to a recent ABC news piece. http://tinyurl.com/2fyejmv

 

 

 

EPA Requests Public Comment on Inerts



The EPA is requesting public comment on options for disclosing inert ingredients in pesticides. Inert ingredients, which can be highly toxic, are part of the end use product formulation, but are not defined as active against the target organism. Revealing inert ingredients will help consumers make informed decisions and may lead to better protection of public health and the environment. Public

 

disclosure is one way to discourage the use of hazardous  inert ingredients in pesticide formulations. Pesticide manufacturers usually disclose their inert ingredients only to the EPA. Currently EPA evaluates the safety of all ingredients in a product's formulation when determining whether the pescticide should be registered.  On October 1, 2009 the EPA responded to two petitions that designated more than 350 inert pesticide ingredients as hazardous. The petitioners asked EPA to require that these ingredients be identified on the labels of products that include them in their formulations.  Despite their name, inert ingredients are neither chemically, biologically or toxicologically inert. In general, inert ingredients are minimally tested, hower, many are known to state, federal and international agencies to be hazardous to human health. A 2009 Study, finds that an inert ingredient in the popular herbicide, RoundUp, POEA, is more deadly to human embryonic, placental and umbilical cord cells than the herbicide itself. POEA is a surfacant, or detergent, derived from animal fat. It is added to RoundUp and other herbicides to help them penetrate plants' surfaces, making the week killer more effective.

 

Take Action: Submit your comments by going to www.regulation.gov and use docket number EPA-HQ-OPP-2009-0635. Comments must be received by February 22, 2010.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

                                                                                                                            

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Herbicide in Drinking Water



Atrazine levels exceed federal regulations




Atrazine—an herbicide widely used in agriculture—has shown up in some Illinois drinking water systems at levels that exceed the federal standard of 3.0 parts per billion (ppb). In addition, atrazine levels have spiked to over 12 ppb in more than 40 water systems in Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, and Kansas, levels that require mandatory notification of residents. However, residents were not notified in any of these cases and the Environmental Protection Agency has not published the results.

Source: Huffington Post Investigative Fund, New York Times

Popular Herbicide Toxic to Human Liver Cells



Study questions safety of “inert” ingredients




French researchers recently published a study in the journal Toxicology that found glyphosate-based herbicides, when combined with so-called “inert” ingredients, can disrupt human liver cell function at very low doses. While safety testing performed on glyphosate alone, as required under federal law, shows few toxicity concerns, researchers are increasingly finding human health risks from glyphosate products as packaged and sold to consumers. This suggests that glyphosate becomes much more toxic when combined with other chemicals.

Despite manufacturers’ claims that glyphosate-based products do not present a significant health or environmental hazard, consumers should be made aware of the growing list of potential health risks and weigh their options before applying these products around the home.

Pesticide Linked to Parkinson's disease



New research strengthens link between pesticids and Parkinson's




Recent research found that patients with Parkinson’s disease were more likely to have detectable levels of beta-hexachlorocyclohexane (beta-HCH), an organochlorine pesticide, in their blood than healthy patients or those with Alzheimer’s. Those with Parkinson’s also had higher than average levels of beta-HCH in their blood.

While this class of pesticides was banned in the U.S. in the 1970s, it can persist in people and the environment for decades.

Evidence linking pesticides and Parkinson’s has been found since the 1990s, but this research is the first to pinpoint a particular chemical.

For more information on the health risks of pesticides, see our factsheet Pesticides in Schools & Childcares: What Are the Health Risks?

Source: Reuters

Water Worries



'THIS RAISES A RED FLAG' | Potentially toxic bug repellent DEET turns up in Sun-Times tests of Chicago's drinking water




In this age of West Nile virus, Lyme disease and other insect-borne health threats, millions of Americans have made slathering and spritzing themselves with the powerful repellent DEET part of their summer routine.





> More Information



Intersex Frogs Found in Suburban Areas



Common frogs that live in suburban areas are more likely than their rural counterparts to develop reproductive abnormalities, according to David Skelly, PhD, professor of ecology at the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies.





> More Information




 
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